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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
elsewhere. alaska is not hospitable environment. ed markey is running nomnation in liberal state. picking up green group nominations. that same day the league of conservation voters. i think more about that, than anything else. for him to be shocked people respond to tax policy is itself shocking. melissa: if you tax something, it is meant to discourage whatever behavior that is. shell responded and said while we're aware of the tax environment wherever we operate the driver for our operational decisions is going to be governed by safety. the tax policy in question i would add, by the way is that they were think of drilling on the outer continental shelf, there you would pay regular federal corporate income tax of 35%. otherwise, they were paying the alaska production tax which can be as high as 75%. i say if they were moving it for tax reasons they should just own it and get out in front of it. what is wrong with that? so you're moving it to go drill in a spot or keep it in a spot that is going to provide a better tax environment for you. this is company. isn't that what they're supposed to
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root and was, essentially, you know, became more or and more vir you lent. there were a number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya would in retrospect signal a, you know, to people who were watching this that things were not going well in libya, that essentially the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be, to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was the pass kerr in -- massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head of -- under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. and the east, you know, in a very tightly-knit tribal society an act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi, basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment a
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
, a has been is missing but with children, have protection concerns in a can't environment or in an urban environment. and so we will look at that population and want to identify those, those people. sometimes people with medical conditions, they can't be treated in a camp. and makes them again more vulnerable and we will look at those populations. so it's kind of a broad array of vulnerabilities that we try to assess. >> ms. strack and, therefore, could you identify, we're talking about those who are eligible for consideration. there has been an identification of an emphasis on those who have participated in assisting the united states efforts either in the military intelligence, otherwise, nongovernment organizations have been put themselves into some peril. what is the distinction between those who are humanitarian versus those who have performed to the benefit of our interests and are therefore being given consideration because of the exposure that may result from that service? >> i would say the programs working in several ways to address both humanitarian concerns and those who work
mentioned, the things america needs to do to stay competitive in this challenging economic environment, domestically and globally? >> absolutely. first, you've got to get through the fiscal issues. balance in the deficit and budgets, number one. and then we need to get to tax reform. it is a big deal. there has not been a major renovation to the tax code since 1986, and that is before the internet. immigration is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven yea
the environment or involvement either way. there are a number of pirates, illegal fishing and that is considered piracy. toxic waste dumping is another form of piracy. as long as these interlinked factors are out there, i expect the piracy to be cyclical. remember. in 2006, there were very few attacks. they were able to control
care, but economics, education, climate change, the environment. i think you see a lot of different opinions and thoughts and ideas of how to get sun and how we find compromise in the united states senate. >> host: how did that play out in the number of leadership roles in congress? >> guest: is a great place to be. we have a new number and then in the senate serving as chairs of committees. in fact, senator barbara mikulski is the first woman to serve as the chair of the powerful appropriations committee and how that would change dynamics of the committee will see in the years to come. dianne feinstein in charge of intelligence. barbara boxer, more and more. patty murray goes through the list on budgets. and on the high side, we now have seven women ranking on major committees in the house. i should remind you that the house republicans a course in the majority have zero win in sharing any major committees. in fact, they are all white and cherry age or communities that have one women sharing a minor committee and that happens to be the administration committee. so we feel we are in
monoxide there is the beginning consciousness about the environment, of a legacy of 100 years in the oil industry that has really damaged the environment. there's a lot to be done in terms of the country. but what was said previously, the venezuelan deficit is not out of line with the rest of latin america. public debt is less than the last fiscal that is less than 7.8% from a public that is about 45%, wait in line with latin america. latin america is more united than ever before. it 12 years ago you did not have the union of the line unions. you did not have latin americans resolving own internal affairs as was the case in bolivia and part of bolivia's right wing attempt to separate from bolivia and to the president of chile creating or calling for a meeting of presidents and making a declaration about the integrity of bolivia. i think it speaks to the fact latin america is confident in ways we have never seen before. i think venezuela has played in a court ruling that as an advocate to regional integration. >> michael shifter, what about these changes at the regional level of venezuela
in afghanistan? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leadership [indiscernible] in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic as we lo
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
contracts, for fostering a lot of the corruption in the country. so this is the environment in which president obama and president karzai will be meeting, trying to hammer out some agreement. on the other hand, president karzai would probably be well served by a larger u.s. presence in afghanistan because the more u.s. troops you have there, the more afghan soldiers they're going to train, the better equipped the afghan force is going to be. so again, this is going to be a really tough set of negotiations to see where that number falls. i can tell you, just in the last day or a couple days, i'm hearing more and more that that 6,000 figure is way more likely than that 10,000 figure. >> i suppose either way, numbers of troops is one thing, amounts of money is another. afghan military we've helped bill up cost way more than the afghan government is able to afford, it's billions of dollars still have to go in. >> reporter: yeah. they're owing to have downsize the military. they were building up the afghan military to sort of push back the taliban. but it was always clear that at some poi
the crop insurance program. jenna: last question. we talk about the environment we talk about the fiscal environment, and that is very much reality for you as the secretary of agriculture. where do you see the opportunity to cut, when you look at your own budget in the fiscal environment in the year ahead where are you looking potentially for the savings of american people. >> we reduced our budget by 12 1/2%. our workforce is down by 6,000 folks. we're restructuring, closing offices and being more efficient but there is also the opportunity within the farm programs. that is one of the missed opportunities not getting the farm bill passed because there were reforms in what the senate passed and what the house ag committee passed would have provide somewhere between 23 and $34 billion worth of savings. hopefully we rest sure rec reforms as we continue the debate this year. jenna: nice to have you on the program. really appreciate your time today. >> thank you. jon: now this fox news alert. testimony just wrapped up in a colorado courtroom revealing some chilling new details about the movi
a proper environment in which to do their jobs and that will include making sure that don't ask, don't tell and elimination of don't ask, don't tell is fully implemented. >> with regard to the military budget, he has called the military a bloated organization. chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey, said this week that we are on the brink of creating a hollow force. would a secretary of defense hagel pro-provide over the hollowing out of the defense department? >> the biggest concern with respect to who will league out is this sequester that's hanging like a sword over the department. that's what they had tried -- have to not let that happen but with respect to going in and finding things within the department of defense that perhaps you don't need or you can eliminate, if that's what you mean by bloat, i hope he does find bloat and gets rid of it. >> agree with his characterization that it's bloated? >> bloated doesn't necessarily mean the whole department is bloated. bloated mean there is are probably things in the department that you can take a hard look at and determine whether or
itself in an environment of which the president's won re-election and they don't want him to do anything he wants. they're also very muched concerned generally about what hagel probably intends to do and that is to continue panetta's effort to streamline the pentagon and make budget cuts. those who are in favor of a strong defense are against that and therefore against hagel's perception more cuts are necessary and finally there is a great deal of concern about hagel's statement that unilateral american action in trying to restrict what iran can do economically and with its money, hagel doesn't think that's a good thing to do and lots of people on both sides of the aisle in the senate who disagree with hagel about that and hearing about that in the hearings. >> it's interesting, colonel, that, again, going back to his war record and when you look at our nation as the president pointed out, could have a leader as secretary of defense who has been in that situation. he knows what it is like to have young men and women in the mud and the ground and like to see people, you go in to war with
diversity and we are in a tough political environment. with key cabinet picks already announced, the defense, state, and cia, the shift is now on others. >> does he settle on these names or still sifting through tough choices? >> he will make an announcement when he makes a decision. >> reporter: timothy geithner is expected to leave and although wall street and progressives are he can pressed concerns. someone with business expertise and with lisa jackson departing the environmental protection agency, a replacement is needed for her, too. it's a second-term ritual that douglas brinkley is often -- >> they pick people they wish they could have picked the first time around but you can't with the politics of a campaign when you're first making to the white house. >> reporter: climate is still a factor. susan rice withdrew her name to replace hillary clinton under pressure over her actions after the benghazi attacks. >> i think the political climate matters a lot now with who you pick. it shouldn't but it does. >> reporter: and there's pressure under the president to consider diversity after a
the environment. >> reporter: environmentalists say this airport sits on top of an aquifer that supplies the town and the rest of long island with its drinking water. presumably what is above-ground affects what is below ground. the water comes below ground. if vehicles are sitting above it they could be leaking things like oil or gas and they are concerned it will taint what comes out of the taps. >> road runnoff is the third largest contributor to ground pollution on long island. these people have gone to the center of the island's most pristine drinking water supply and put some 35,000 wrecked vehicles. a truly bad idea. >> reporter: well the town says there are 15,000, not 35 thousand cars. they're parked on pavement. they're all inspected every day and they will all be gone in three to six months, martha. martha: interesting story. thanks so much, rick. bill: now to a murder mystery after a lottery winner is found dead right after winning the jackpot. what happened there? martha: that is a strange story. the gun control fight is heating up while consumers what? customers didn't like it. so w
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
environment. >> right. i think that also to bring back to the other question, and bring back to my state, back to new jersey where he is the governor. >> and seton hall where you teach, and you guys educated him. >> and seton hall law school, and the best law school in the country, absolutely, but in the state, when you talk about the bench of democrats the reality is that we do have great folks out there who would like to be governor. and right now, we have a governor who is pop youer lat the moment, but when we go out to remind people everyday that this is the guy who thinks that raising the minimum wage from $7.50 to $8.50 is too much, and governor who believes that he should be cutting back and in the letter, perfect, cutting back in women's health care and cut, cutting, and saying ing that we can't have taxes on millionaires when people are suffering. when we have unemployment way above the national rate, and there is a record that he has that is absolutely antithetical to what we believe in this state, and harsh against the working families and against same-sex marriage, and games what t
. do it again. do it again. do it again. >> i'm focused with professionals in a controlled environment. to my surprise, lou describes this as a the pussy cat of weapons. >> what'd you think about shooting that? >> reporter: i have to agree with lou, it's a very gentle gun. >> it is. >> reporter: my city has lots of police and lots of gun laws. as a civilian, i can't carry a firearm here. lou, a former cop, can, and never leaves home without one. his concern -- >> they're legislating laws that do not impact the criminal element. in other words, the only people that obey the law are law-abiding citizens. >> reporter: the aurora movie theater shooter used three firearms, one a shotgun similar to this. a single cartridge, multiple pellets, maximum damage. >> you can smell the powder, too. >> absolutely. >> reporter: i'm torn between fascination and fear. i understand self-protection and competitive sport but gun crime is a reality in my city. >> i look at people as being evil, you know? i've never seen a gun jump up on its own and shoot someone. >> reporter: so i change my scenario. if i l
or attempts on his life three times and operates in a very difficult political environment and has an insurgency going. so i think if you put all of those factors in play, suddenly you get a better measure of the kind of what he has facing him. i'm not saying that president karzai is a perfect leader. but what i'm saying is we should try to understand that context and i think it can allow us to deal better with a leader like him? >> in your book you write this about the afghan president. hamid karzai was a man of strong emotions and loyalties rubbed raw sometimes to cynicism by long years and slowed to trust but chited to relationships. you spent a lot of travel time with him. bottom line, is he doing what he needs to do? >> well, i'm not on the ground to junl the current activities but i think he's doing what he thinks he has to do, and that is navigate a western coalition that is very skeptical of the mission and desirous of pulling out, dealing with a taliban insurgency and then internal politics. so i think if you really look at his challenge, he's walking a tight rope in a sti
he kind of gets away with it. one area he has credibility is on the environment. many years ago before it was a mainstream subject, he was championing protecting the rain forest and wildlife. he was talking about that today on british tv and he made a few comments. he says since he found out he's going to become a grandfather, the duchess of cambridge is obviously pregnant, his opinions about conservation have actually become much stronger. >> have gone on for years about importance of thinking, about the long term, in relation to environmental damage, climate change, everything else. because we don't really in a sense airline world want to hand on an increasingly dysfunctional world to our grandchildren. and i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild say, why didn't you do something. so clearly, now that there's a -- we'll have a grandchild, obviously, it makes it even more obvious, you know, to try and make sure we have them, leave them something that isn't a totally poisoned -- >> this is something, wolf, he spoke about in the past. he thinks it's the greatest thre
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)